☞ Networked Society

☞ Time For Intervention

☞ Maintenance required

☞ An Assault On Digital Freedoms

☞ Imbalanced

  • At a recent debate in the House of Lords on the Digital Economy Bill, a number of amendments designed to ensure citizen rights (as opposed to most terms of the DEB that limit citizen rights in defence on corporate rights) were rejected by the UK government on the basis they would upset the delicate balance of UK law.

    Yet here we see the very same Bill seriously disrupting the delicate balance of rights voters already enjoy. You’ll no longer be able to offer your guests easy wifi access, ruining evolving and desirable modes of work and interaction in order to shore up the 20th century monopolies of Lord Mandelson’s media friends.

    I’ve not heard nearly enough from the opposition parties on this stuff, making me fear they will just do more of the same – not a surprise, it’s advance preparation for ACTA ratification. It’s election time; we need to make sure the politicians know we care about this stuff.

  • UK citizens can sign this petition to the UK government calling for transparency.
  • Useful summary from Michael Geist – worth asking your representatives why your government hates transparency if you’re in one of the countries opposing it.
  • Peter Tribble documents some of the comments made by Oracle’s representative in theOpenSolaris annual meeting. Net: Oracle intends to keep going with OpenSolaris.

☞ Gestures

✍ By Its Fruit

Tree stump with bracket fungi§ Where are all the bad laws coming from?

One of the worst things you can find in your home is the surface signs of fungal growth, especially the fruiting bodies of “dry rot”. The fungus itself is bad enough, but its appearance tells you something even more worrying; that the structure of the building is riddled with an invisible infection. The first thing you see is the terrible fungi; they tell you it’s time to treat the infection.

For a considerable time, we have been seeing the “fruiting bodies” appearing all over the world’s legislatures. Country after country has seen smart politicians attempting to introduce laws that are complex for the average citizen to understand. They sound plausibly necessary when famous musicians or media impresarios call for a cure for “theft” and beg us all to think of them, in rags on the streets in retirement busking to live because organised criminals with baby faces have stolen their birthright. Continue reading

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