✍ Actually I Do Care

§ There was an article on Boing Boing over the weekend that includes a leaked copy of an e-mail sent by Richard Mollett, head of BPI (that’s the UK’s version of RIAA). He provides his key constituents with a round-up on news on the Digital Economy Bill, the legislative omnibus for all that’s bad in ACTA and the UK’s equivalent of the DMCA. Apparently, Mollet believes there is no groundswell of opposition for the Digital Economy Bill and that MPs will just wave it through for lack of popular concern.

Wouldn’t it be great to prove him wrong? If you are in the UK, you can very easily write to your MP and ask him or her to demand a full debate in Parliament on the Digital Economy Bill. I just sent this to my MP; feel free to copy, adapt and improve my text:

Dear Alan Whitehead,

I’m very concerned that the Digital Economy Bill is being rushed
through Parliament without adequate scrutiny. Will you be calling for a
full debate on the Bill please?

My concern is that it tampers with the balance of copyright law in the
Internet age without a full appreciation of unintended consequences.
The equivalent bill in the USA, the DMCA, has been a source of abusive
attacks on free speech and business competition (outside the intended
scope of the Act) from the beginning, and I fully expect that the
Digital Economy Bill in its present form will likewise prove to chill
innovation and society.

Yours sincerely,

Simon Phipps

By the way, apart from his job at BPI, Mollett is also the prospective Labour candidate for SW Surrey in the upcoming election. If you are one of his potential constituents you may wish to ask him about his commitment to your 21st century freedoms.

Feel free to pass a link to this post to your friends suggesting they take action too…

Advertisements

3 Responses

  1. Thank you for this Simon. I sent of an email to my MP and I hope she will act.

    Cheers
    Suhail

  2. Tweeted out, email sent to my MP

    Dear Ann Cryer

    I’m hugely concerned that the Digital Economy Bill is being rushed
    through Parliament without adequate scrutiny. I believe that a matter
    that will impact massively on civil liberties in the digital age
    requires very careful consideration and consultation and would ask that
    you call for a full debate on the Bill.

    My concern centres round the fact that it tampers with the balance of
    copyright law in the Internet age without a full appreciation of
    unintended consequences, and that it will become a tool that enables
    those with the money to threaten legal action and silence innovation in
    the same way that our current libel laws are recognised internationally
    as being used to silence legitimate criticism. The equivalent bill in
    the USA, the DMCA, has been a source of abusive attacks on free speech
    and business competition (outside the intended scope of the Act) from
    the beginning, and my concern is that the Digital Economy Bill in its
    present form will have a similar effect.

    We already have amendments to the bill proposed by LibDem peers in
    collaboration with Conservative peers that would effectively enable
    corporations to close down and remove our freedom to use services that
    enable us to legitimately share large computer files such as home video
    with overseas family members out of fears that some may use these
    services for piracy. Limitations of email file sizes would mean that
    family members would be unable to share their home video via the
    internet, as an example of the restriction of legitimate use as a
    potential consequence of this bill as it stands.

    Yours sincerely,

    Adam Sargant

  3. […] ✍ Actually I Do Care There was an article on Boing Boing over the weekend that includes a leaked copy of an e-mail sent by Richard Mollett, head of BPI (that’s the UK’s version of RIAA). He provides his key constituents with a round-up on news on the Digital Economy Bill, the legislative omnibus for all that’s bad in ACTA and the UK’s equivalent of the DMCA. Apparently, Mollet believes there is no groundswell of opposition for the Digital Economy Bill and that MPs will just wave it through for lack of popular concern. […]

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: